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Betacaroteno StrongCages

Betacaroteno StrongCages
Betacaroteno StrongCages
  • Availability: In Stock
  • Brands StrongCages
  • Model 3401
  • Reward Points: 3
3.60€

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It is advisable to mix canthaxanthin or carofil, which provide an intense color, with beta carotene, which gives shine.
 
In nature, beta-carotene is found in many fruits and vegetables, among which the carrot or tomato stands out. As a chemical, beta-carotene has a dark orange color. It is water soluble, so it can be administered both with the breeding paste, the most used system, and with water. The degree of pigmentation it provides is low, but instead gives a great shine to the plumage. That's why to get good results, beta-carotene has to be mixed with canthaxanthin or carofil. In addition, beta-carotene is transformed into vitamin A and has antioxidant action on cells, delaying aging.
 
The dosage Finally, the pigmentation result may vary depending on the amount and type of dye that we incorporate into the diet. If we use pure pigments (10%), the dosage can range from 5 to 10 grams per kg of pulp, although each breeder will have to finish doing what the experience and the results advise him. If we use brand dyes, the dose is given to the same manufacturer, but here we will also have to see what the result is about our canaries.
 
Regarding the type of dye, we have already seen that they have different characteristics. As a general rule it is advisable to mix canthaxanthin or carofil, which provide an intense color, with beta carotene, which gives shine. There is no agreement about the proportion of each colorant. A mixture type if we use pigments with a concentration of 10% would be 7 parts of cataxanthin and 3 parts of beta carotene.
 
Includes dosing spoon.

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